Proving your worth: How to build an evidence base

Wednesday 9th May - 16:15-16:55

Say you have a great activity project that’s engaging new audiences and delivering positive health outcomes. You’re really excited about it, and now you want to roll it out.

There are, no doubt, a growing number of funding streams to support such initiatives, but if there’s one thing health commissioners are looking for, it’s solid evidence – data that proves the direct, causal link between your physical activity initiative and the health improvements recorded among participants.

And gathering such data is easier said than done. Where do you even start?

This session will explore what good evidence looks like; how to collect effective data that demonstrates real behaviour change and real results; and how to access funding – including details of what funding providers require in terms of evidence.

The session will also explore how data can be shared across the sector to increase participation and improve the nation’s health.

Chair:
Dr Steven Mann, Head of Healthy Communities at Places for People Leisure

Day 1: 16:15-16:55 Evidence

Dr Steve Mann has nearly 10 years years’ experience in the leisure management sector, leading sector wide research into getting the inactive, active. Steve joined social enterprise Places for People Leisure earlier this year to help meet their social objective of ‘creating active places and healthy people’.

As Head of Healthy Communities Steve ensures that the 123 leisure facilities that Places for People Leisure manage on behalf of its local authority partners are inspirational and accessible places, that engage with all members of communities and encourage them to enjoy a lifelong love of physical activity.


Panellists include:

Speaker:
Dr Nick Cavill, Managing Director at Cavill Associates

Speaker:
Graeme Sinnott, Performance Insight Manager at CSP Network National Team

Speaker:
Dr Thomas Yates, Reader in Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health at University of Leicester and NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC)